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Sweets can make you fat

Sweets can make you fat


Every week, the Null dissects the most self-evident studies and pointless papers not to hit the headlines. It's harsh, but funny. This week, Andrew Impey discusses the merits of sticky buns.

A rise in childhood obesity in both the UK and USA has been blamed on the increased consumption of soft drinks. However, before we all rush off home to enforce a 'water only' policy on our kids, there could be a vital flaw in the plan.

It's not just soft drinks that affect children's weight. Hard as it is to believe, there's a good chance that a sticky bun or packet of sweets may also be having a detrimental affect on little Jonny's waistline.

As if this revelation wasn't shocking enough, the researchers, writing in the International Journal of Food Science and Nutrition, also point out a lack of physical activity in obese British children.

Hot on the heels of this research is an American report which confirms that teaching children from an early age about healthy eating can lower their health risks in later life.

So children - look both ways when you cross the road; wash your hands when you've been to the toilet and modify your cholesterol intake to less than 200 milligrams per day.


More studies of the bleedin' obvious:

- You don't say - Adults baby-talk to babies
- Shiver me timbers - Teens likely to be a bit lazy
- Well blow me down - Wearing clothes can prevent sunburn
- Hold the press and gird your loins - The longer you spend in ambulances, the more likely you are to die


This article originally appeared in our regular column on the Daily Telegraph website.


Image: Carlos Paes

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02 Jan 2011
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